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HTS Nursery Starter

Plant growth is determined by the balance of roots to shoots/leaves through the concentration of hormones and nutrients inside the plant cells. In nursery & transplanting

situations, the root to shoot ratios are artificially disturbed through the process of constricting roots in containers and damaging them when transplanting them to their more permanent locations. This results in hormone imbalance that delays plant growth and causes a visual decline in quality while the plant is re-establishing the correct hormone gradients for their new locations in the field or garden. This is called transplant shock and it can be prevented.


WHY:

Auxins (AU) are made in the shoots and flow down the plant via gravity to induce signals to grow new roots in the soil when they reach them. Cytokinins (CK) are made in the roots and are actively transported into the shoots to signal new leaves to grow. Where the shoots meet the roots (i.e. near the soil line) the net effects are zero (AU=CK) marking the transition. During transplanting this balance is disturbed, causing stress and the production of stress hormones like ethylene. Therefore, plants need time to re-balance and adjust before growing again - the longer this takes, the less energy is available for normal growth and development causing the plant to lag; delaying/reducing flowers, fruits, growth, ornamental value and even eventually, yield.

SIGNALS VS. STRUCTURES:

The hormones mentioned above are the signals that direct the response of the plant to the environment, but because these hormones are naturally made in specific plant organs, we need the building blocks to make those plant parts so the hormone signal can be managed and maintained without constant application of products. All plants require essential nutrients, but in nursery & transplant situations some nutrients and co-factors are more important than others. The goal of transplanting is to re-establish a functioning root system so it is important to provide these building blocks at transplant to increase success. To promote this, plants need:


  1. Zinc - the mineral co-factor that supports auxin production and transport from the shoot to the root.

  2. Calcium - the essential nutrient responsible for cell wall strength that allows the new feeder roots to penetrate deeply into hard, unforgiving soils (which is opposite to the soilless media used in nurseries and vegetable seedling trays).

  3. Trytophan - the building block and starter material for the plant to make auxin.

  4. Boron - the mineral that stops the degradation of auxin.

  5. Antioxidants - compounds that destroy ethylene and directly prevent the stress signal inside the cell.


GUARANTEED ANALYSIS


Total Nitrogen (N)......................4.00%

4.00% Urea Nitrogen (N)

Sulfur (S)......................................4.00%

4..00% Sulfur (S)

Zinc (Zn).......................................7.00%

0.35% Chelated Zinc (Zn)

Calcium (Ca)...............................4.00%

4.00% Chelated Calcium (Ca)

Boron (B).....................................0.50%

0.50% Boron (B)


Derived From: Urea, zinc sulfate, calcium EDTA and boric acid


NON-PLANT FOOD INGREDIENTS


Humid Acid..................................0.10%

Fulvic Acid...................................0.10%

Yeast Extract................................0.06%

Tryptophan...................................3.00%

Antioxidant...................................3.00%

Cytokinin (kinetin).........................0.009%

Auxin (IBA).......................................0.009%


Purpose: To balance hormone profiles, stop transplant shock and enhance nutrient uptake.